NXTW

stuffs
themathkid:

Packing L-shapes into a square. In this case, the size of the L’s form an arithmetic progression 1, 2, 3, … , 49. Odd sizes are symmetric and evens are nearly so [no long L’s in other words]. 

themathkid:

Packing L-shapes into a square. In this case, the size of the L’s form an arithmetic progression 1, 2, 3, … , 49. Odd sizes are symmetric and evens are nearly so [no long L’s in other words]. 

(via visualizingmath)

wired:

Yes, we’ve calculated the physics of bending an iPhone in your skinny jeans.
MORE.

wired:

Yes, we’ve calculated the physics of bending an iPhone in your skinny jeans.

MORE.

(Source: Wired)

fouriestseries:

Cops and Robbers (and Zombies and Humans)

Cops and Robbers is a mathematical game in which pursuers (cops) attempt to capture evaders (robbers). The game is one of many pursuit-evasion games, each of which is governed by a different set of rules. The general goal of these problems is to determine the number of pursuers required to capture a given number of evaders.

The GIFs above show two versions of the game. The first is similar to the standard Cops and Robbers rendition, and the second is best described as “Zombies and Humans”.

In both versions, an evader moves in the direction that gets it furthest away from the pursuers (focusing more on the closer pursuers), and a pursuer moves in the direction that gets it closest to the evaders (focusing more on the closer evaders).

In the first simulation, members of both groups have a constant speed. In the second simulation, members of a group move more quickly the closer they are to members of the opposite group, and slower when further away.

Mathematica code posted here.

Additional sources not linked above: [1] [2]

(via visualizingmath)

Magic carpet

visualizingmath:

Submitted by TheFrankensTeam:

In the model you can change the number of dots and the deviation too. If you set the “type demo” to dynamic it will make possible to analyse how the wave-pattern changes when deviation grows.

theparonomasiac:

Is this all? There’s so much more to Friedman numbers. Consecutive ones… They exist in different bases… They work with Roman numerals, which is fucking cool.

theparonomasiac:

Is this all? There’s so much more to Friedman numbers. Consecutive ones… They exist in different bases… They work with Roman numerals, which is fucking cool.

(via visualizingmath)