NXTW

stuffs

ibmblr:

World’s Fair 50:

The Automatic Language Translator

Another World’s Fair crowd pleaser was the IBM Automatic Language Translator. In a live demonstration, the computer translated Russian text into English in a matter of seconds.

The most amazing part was that the translation wasn’t created from a computerized ‘dictionary search’ but from the analysis of both languages’ complex nuances and shades of meaning, syntax and grammar. To think that 50 years later, we have smart phones with translation apps for just about every language spoken.  Очень здорово. Translation: Very cool.  

 

(via fastcompany)

mathani:

Get you best paper, cut a circle and fold it, fold it so that the circumference falls on a fixed point inside. Repeat, using random folds. Now see the creases. This is how you paper-fold an ellipse.

mathani:

Get you best paper, cut a circle and fold it, fold it so that the circumference falls on a fixed point inside. Repeat, using random folds. Now see the creases. This is how you paper-fold an ellipse.

(via visualizingmath)

Raspberry Pi with I2C-Arduino-Slave

binerry:

image

Since Raspberry Pi has only about 8 GPIO’s (or up to 17 if you reconfigure UART, SPI and I2C as GPIO) or for some other reasons, it may be helpful to combine Raspberry Pi with another μC or PIC (or even a ready-to-use μC-/PIC-Board like Arduino, Netduino or Pinguino) e.g. to get more I/O’s or just to seperate two different application areas. Such a combination is surely easy to setup via serial or usb - but at least if serial/usb is already in use or if you are thinking about using more than one further μC or PIC its getting a bit clumsy. Much more flexible and cleaner will be a solution via I2C - in this case you can easily address up to 128 slaves.

Read More

talyellin:

Exploring the first 100 digits of PI.
3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974944592307816406286208998628034825342117067

talyellin:

Exploring the first 100 digits of PI.

3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974944592307816406286208998628034825342117067

(via visualizingmath)

Anonymous asked: which is the most perfect geometrical figure?

visualizingmath:

I’m not sure, Anonymous! I’m just going to say it’s the circle.

Anywho, while trying to form an opinion on the answer to your question, I looked up “circle” on Wikipedia and found this picture:

image

"Area enclosed by a circle = π × area of the shaded square." I know it’s not very impressive, but I’ve just never thought of it like that! Thanks, Anon.